FishyLeaks

FishyLeaks - the watery world's response to WikiLeaks - trawls the murky waters of the global salmon farming industry for leaked documents from whistleblowers and documents obtained via Freedom of Information. 

BREAKING NEWS - 4 February 2013

Scottish Salmon Infested With Parasites - Sea Lice Data Reveals 1001 Reasons to Boycott Farmed Salmon!

Scottish salmon and sea trout are infested with sea lice parasites according to new data released by Marine Scotland via Freedom of Information and published online via FishyLeaks

FOI reply email 1 Feb 2013

Infestation levels of up to 145 sea lice per fish were recorded in Shieldaig in Wester Ross in 2012; up to 196 in Laxford in West Sutherland in 2008; 117 in Tarbert in Argyll in 2008; 113 in Sunart in Lochaber in 2008; and a staggering 1001 sea lice on a salmon sampled in Kanaird in Wester Ross in 2008. 

Sea lice

Out of over 11,000 wild salmon and sea trout sampled since 1997 there were 2,750 fish with 10 or more sea lice; 913 fish with 50 or more sea lice and 367 fish with 100 or more sea lice.  By far the worst area was Dundonnell in Wester Ross which reported 40 out of the top 50 infestation rates.   

Download sea lice data made available via FOI (February 2013):

- Kishorn (2010-2012): online here

- Shieldaig (2008-2012): online here

- Gairloch (2011): online here

- West Sutherland (2008-2009): online here

- Wester Ross (2008-2009): online here

- Argyll (2008-2009): online here

- Lochaber (2008-2009): online here

- Outer Hebrides (2008-2009): online here

- Torridon (2008-2009): online here

- All Regions (1997-2009): online here


Read the FOI letter from Marine Scotland on sea lice (1 February 2013) - online here
 

Sea lice photos

Read more online here

BREAKING NEWS - 20 January 2013

FishyLeaks reveals the illegal use of the carcinogenic chemical Formalin in a Special Area of Conservation in Scotland.  Formalin is a highly toxic water-based solution of the known carcinogen Formaldehyde which is used as a preservative for biological specimens including artist Damien Hirst’s pickled sharks, cows and sheep.

Damien Hirst cow


“I’d rather eat one of Damien Hirst’s pickled sharks or pickled horses than chemically embalmed Scottish salmon,” said Don Staniford of the Global Alliance Against Industrial Aquaculture.  “It’s nauseating to think that the Scottish salmon farming industry’s warped idea of preservation is discharging the carcinogenic preservative Formalin into a Special Area of Conservation.  No wonder ‘fresh’ Scottish salmon has such a long shelf life!”

Read more via: "Pickled Scottish Salmon, Anyone?  Rogue Use of Carcinogen in Loch Roag" (20 January 2013)

A new report “Formalin: Scottish Salmon’s Toxic Solution” (sourced from 190 pages of Freedom of Information documents) reveals that:
 
- 1,400 litres of Formalin was discharged into Loch Roag “against SEPA advice”
- Formalin is a ‘carcinogen’, ‘toxic’ with a “danger of very serious irreversible effects”
-  SNH warned of “significant toxicological impacts on marine life of Loch Roag”
- The Scottish Government fast-tracked Formalin use within one week instead of 8 weeks with SEPA and SNH given only 48 hours to respond
- The Scottish Salmon Company failed to consult with conservation bodies despite admitting discharges took place in a Special Area of Conservation and National Scenic Area
 
The Global Alliance Against Industrial Aquaculture (GAAIA) has now filed a complaint with the European Commission for breach of the Habitats Directive and illegal discharges of carcinogenic chemicals into a Special Area of Conservation (read complaint online line). 

The Sunday Herald (13 January 2013) reported on leaked emails from a whistleblower inside the Scottish Salmon Company:

FishyLeaks Sunday Herald 13 Jan 2013

FishyLeaks Sunday Herald 13 Jan 2013 #2

FishyLeaks has been featured in the Los Angeles Times, The Guardian, The Press & Journal, The Stornoway Gazette, West Highland Free Press, The Sunday Herald and Undercurrent News

Fishyleaks P&J Jan 2013

Scroll down below for damning documents including data exposing sea lice infestation in Ireland; toxic chemical use in Scotland and the spread of infectious diseases in Canada!

FishyLeaks, 4 February 2013
 
Scottish Salmon Infested With Parasites
- Sea Lice Data Reveals 1001 Reasons to Boycott Farmed Salmon

Wester Ross, Scotland – Scottish salmon and sea trout are infested with sea lice parasites according to new data released by Marine Scotland via Freedom of Information and published online via FishyLeaks.  Infestation levels of up to 145 sea lice per fish were recorded in Shieldaig in Wester Ross in 2012; up to 196 in Laxford in West Sutherland in 2008; 117 in Tarbert in Argyll in 2008; 113 in Sunart in Lochaber in 2008; and a staggering 1001 sea lice on a salmon sampled in Kanaird in Wester Ross in 2008. 

Sea lice photos


Out of over 11,000 wild salmon and sea trout sampled since 1997 there were 2,750 fish with 10 or more sea lice; 913 fish with 50 or more sea lice and 367 fish with 100 or more sea lice.  By far the worst area was Dundonnell in Wester Ross which reported 40 out of the top 50 infestation rates.   
 
Download sea lice data made available via FOI (February 2013):

- Kishorn (2010-2012): online here

- Shieldaig (2008-2012): online here

- Gairloch (2011): online here

- West Sutherland (2008-2009): online here

- Wester Ross (2008-2009): online here

- Argyll (2008-2009): online here

- Lochaber (2008-2009): online here

- Outer Hebrides (2008-2009): online here

- Torridon (2008-2009): online here

- All Regions (1997-2009): online here

Read the FOI letter from Marine Scotland on sea lice (1 February 2013) - online here

The latest information published by the Scottish Salmon Producers’ Organisation (SSPO) also reveals alarming sea lice infestation levels across Scotland – with salmon farms in North Mainland 263% above the suggested lice treatment threshold of 1.0 adult female lice per fish;  East Shetland 135% above the threshold; and West Shetland 123% above the threshold for the period September to December 2012.  
 
Salmon farming companies operating in Scotland all report growing parasite problems.  “Grieg Seafood Hjaltland has suffered from sea lice challenges in 2012,” stated Grieg Seafood in their Q3 2012 report published last month.  “All regions reported higher sea lice levels at the end of the second quarter of 2012 compared to the second quarter of 2011,” stated Marine Harvest’s Q2 2012 report.  Marine Harvest publishes their Q4 2012 report on Wednesday (6 February). 
 
“Scottish salmon is farmed and dangerous,” said Don Staniford of the Global Alliance Against Industrial Aquaculture.  “Sea lice from salmon farms are killing wild salmon and sea trout across Scotland.  Scottish farmed salmon should be avoided like the plague.” 
 
The revelations comes in the wake of a scientific paper published in November 2012 by the Royal Society which detailed the lethal impact of sea lice from salmon farms on wild salmon.  Scottish Government research published in February 2013 also revealed that sea lice from salmon farms impact wild sea trout up to 32km away.  Another report published in January 2013 by the Rivers & Fisheries Trusts of Scotland detailed increased sea lice infestation levels on wild sea trout during 2012 compared to 2011 with an “increasing infestation pattern” and “detrimental lice loads above critical thresholds”.
 
 
The Scottish Government is protecting the salmon farming from public scrutiny.  Last month, Marine Scotland refused a FOI request on sea lice as “manifestly unreasonable”.  In a debate in the Scottish Parliament (9 January), the Minister for Environment and Climate Change, Paul Wheelhouse, also refused to publish sea lice data.   “It is not that farm-by-farm data on sea lice are not being collected; the issue is more to do with publication,” testified the Minister.  “Why does the Scottish Government seem so reluctant to go down the route of farm-by-farm data collection on sea lice?” asked Alex Fergusson MSP.
 
The issue of sea lice was also debated in December 2012 by the Scottish Parliament’s Rural Affairs, Climate Change and Environment Committee.  “Publication of aggregated figures, controlled by the SSPO, on a delayed basis, is unacceptable in the 21st century for an industry which claims to ‘have nothing to hide’,” stated one submission.  “We need data on a ‘real time’ basis to allow mitigation measures to be put in place at the time of crisis, rather than reflecting on a disaster after it has occurred. Why can Scotland not have a similar level of transparency from the largely Norwegian-owned operators to that which they are obliged to comply with in their home country?”
 
“The Scottish Government’s refusal to publish sea lice data for Scotland’s salmon farms is manifestly unreasonable,” continued Staniford.  “It is shameful that the Scottish Government is allowing the salmon farming industry to hide behind a veil of secrecy on sea lice.  A public register detailing infestation rates on farmed salmon as well as wild salmon and sea trout must be published as a matter of urgency.”
 
In September 2012, FishyLeaks published damning figures revealing a 12-fold increase in the use of toxic chemicals on Scottish salmon farms (due to chemical resistance and the development of so-called ‘super-lice’). In December 2012, FishyLeaks published data from Ireland showing how Marine Harvest was breaching sea lice thresholds with 44 sea lice per farmed salmon.  Last month, FishyLeaks published details of how parasite infestation associated with Amoebic Gill Disease has affected at least 44 salmon farms in Scotland since October 2011.    
 
Contact:
 
Don Staniford (Global Alliance Against Industrial Aquaculture): 07771 541826
==========================================================================================

FishyLeaks, 20 January 2013

Pickled Scottish Salmon, Anyone?
- Rogue Use of Carcinogen in Loch Roag


FishyLeaks reveals that Scottish farmed salmon was illegally doused with the carcinogenic chemical Formalin in a Special Area of Conservation and National Scenic Area on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides.  A new report “Formalin: Scottish Salmon’s Toxic Solution” (sourced from 190 pages of Freedom of Information documents) reveals that:
 
- 1,400 litres of Formalin was discharged into Loch Roag “against SEPA advice”
- Formalin is a ‘carcinogen’, ‘toxic’ with a “danger of very serious irreversible effects”
-  SNH warned of “significant toxicological impacts on marine life of Loch Roag”
- The Scottish Government fast-tracked Formalin use within one week instead of 8 weeks with SEPA and SNH given only 48 hours to respond
- The Scottish Salmon Company failed to consult with conservation bodies despite admitting discharges took place in a Special Area of Conservation and National Scenic Area
 
The Global Alliance Against Industrial Aquaculture (GAAIA) has now filed a complaint with the European Commission for breach of the Habitats Directive and illegal discharges of carcinogenic chemicals into a Special Area of Conservation (read complaint online line). 
 
Formalin is a highly toxic water-based solution of the known carcinogen Formaldehyde which is used as a preservative for biological specimens including artist Damien Hirst’s pickled sharks, cows and sheep. 

Damien Hirst cow

“I’d rather eat one of Damien Hirst’s pickled sharks or pickled horses than chemically embalmed Scottish salmon,” said Don Staniford of the Global Alliance Against Industrial Aquaculture.  “It’s nauseating to think that the Scottish salmon farming industry’s warped idea of preservation is discharging the carcinogenic preservative Formalin into a Special Area of Conservation.  No wonder ‘fresh’ Scottish salmon has such a long shelf life!”

Damien Hirst shark and horse

“The Scottish salmon farming industry is clearly in a bit of pickle, continued Staniford.  “The FOI documents show that the Scottish Salmon Company - aided and abetted by the Scottish Government - went rogue in Loch Roag.  GAAIA is now demanding that the European Commission take swift action against the illegal fast-tracking of carcinogenic chemical discharges into a Special Area of Conservation.  Cheap and nasty Scottish farmed salmon is the black sheep of the family and should be avoided like the plague.”

Damien hirst sheep and pickles

 


“Using carcinogenic chemicals to kill deadly parasites on farmed salmon does nothing to fix the problem,” said Staniford, author of ‘Silent Spring of the Sea’.  “The solution staring us all in the face is to stop farming salmon in the sea and move the cages to land where chemical discharges can be treated and disposed of as safely as possible.  Scotland’s pristine lochs must no longer be used as toxic toilets by the Norwegian-controlled salmon farming industry.”

Damien Hirst cows

“The Scottish salmon farming industry is talking a load of bull when it claims that the use of carcinogenic chemicals is necessary to protect animal welfare,” concluded Staniford, author of the forthcoming report ‘Smoke on the Water, Cancer on the Coast’.  “If the factory fish farming industry cared anything about animal welfare they would not cram hundreds of thousands of Atlantic salmon – a migratory species – into a cage with the equivalent of a bath-tub of water space for each fish.  Salmon farming is sickening.” 
 
The FOI reply from the Scottish Government dated 23 November 2012 detailed 190 pages of documents – read in full online here from the Scottish Government (same file online here).  GAAIA has filed further FOIs requesting data on Formalin use on Scottish salmon farms. 
 
Read more via: “Formalin: Scottish Salmon’s Toxic Solution

3 pack cancer sickening
Earlier this month, FishyLeaks revealed leaked internal e-mails from a whistleblower inside the Scottish Salmon Company disparaging local communities on the Isle of Harris a “viper’s nest”. 
 
For more food for thought on the toxic chemicals used on Scottish salmon farms please read:
 
Scottish Salmon’s Toxic Toilets Named & Shamed!” (GAAIA, 11 September 2012)
 
Media Backgrounder: Chemical Culture in Scotland” (GAAIA, September 2012)
 
Loch Duart: The Toxic Salmon Company” (GAAIA, September 2012)
 
Scottish fish farmers use record amounts of parasite pesticides” (The Guardian, 10 September 2012)

 Read press release online as a PDF via: "Pickled Scottish Salmon, Anyone?  Rogue Use of Carcinogen in Loch Roag" (20 January 2013)
==========================================================================================


FishyLeaks, 8 January 2013

Whistleblower at Scottish Salmon:

The Company Who Kicked the Viper’s Nest

Leaked internal emails from a whistleblower inside the Scottish Salmon Company reveal the utter contempt foreign-owned salmon farming companies have for local communities in the Western Isles of Scotland.  

Read the leaked emails from the Scottish Salmon Company in full online here and a media backgrounder in full online here

Read the Stornoway Gazette (10 January):

FishyLeaks SG jan 2013

“Let the locals get used to it” is the privately held view of a company publicly listed on the Norwegian Stock Exchange, registered in Jersey and owned by a who’s who of Swiss and Norwegian banks and investors (over 85% of Scottish salmon farming production is now controlled by foreign - mostly Norwegian – interests exported to overseas markets such as China).      
 
One community on the Isle of Harris in the Outer Hebrides is disparaged by the Scottish Salmon Company’s ‘Environmental Manager’ Rebecca Dean as a “vipers nest” despite a company policy which advocates “building strong relationships with the community”.   

 SSC vipers nest

“Yes, there is a biomass strategy target, and I am well aware of it and we will max out what we can, where we can,” writes Rebecca Dean.  “But Plocrapol is a guaranteed vipers nest, with the huge delays that will create, and the demands on Council (and The Scottish Salmon Company) time, could be better spent on other sites that may be less oppositional (couldn't get much worse than Ploc...well, there is always Arran of course...or Toa, but).”
 
“Let’s spend the energy fighting those battles, and filling the Council’s time,” writes the Scottish Salmon Company’s ‘Environmental Manager’ who recommends focussing on expansion in the Uists.  “We might as well try avoid, for now at least, the ones we are certain will be lengthy, tiring, negative PR battles.”    
 

SSC Vipers Nest email #1 Rebecca Dean

 
“I absolutely agree we look where there is less chance of time consuming opposition,” replies the Scottish Salmon Company’s CEO Stewart McLelland who admits expansion at their disease-ridden Isle of Arran farm at Lamlash Bay is “difficult”.  “This way we ensure we get the good publicity and demonstrate the advantages of working together,” he writes.  “What we need to do is have a session just on the Hebrides to discuss strategy then tactics.” 
 

SSC Vipers Nest email #2 Stewart McLelland


With these leaked internal documents published via FishyLeaks and the prospect of further revelations, the Scottish Salmon Company’s policy of avoiding what it refers to as “angst” and “hoo-haa” has now come back to bite it on the corporate ass.   
 
Snake bite
“The Scottish Salmon Company is a venomous snake in the grass,” said Don Staniford of the Global Aquaculture Alliance Against Industrial Aquaculture who received the leaked documents anonymously in the mail.  “Thanks to this brave whistleblower the Scottish public can now see the poisonous bile being spewed by this shameless Swiss/Norwegian-owned company.  Local communities across the Highlands and Islands are now fighting back against the deadly diseases and PR poison being peddled by the foreign-owned salmon farming companies choking the lifeblood out of the Scottish coast.”   
 

Snake in grass

 

“Don’t be fooled by the oily handshakes of corporate Fish Farming PR,” urged the Outer Hebrides Against Fish Farms in November 2012.  “Get the facts from independent sources…but remember a lot of the facts that shame this industry are hidden behind government supported nets of secrecy.”


Read the leaked emails from the Scottish Salmon Company in full online here and a media backgrounder in full online here
 
Read more revelations from the whistleblower inside the Scottish Salmon Company online here and online here 

Contact:  Don Staniford: 07771 541826

========================================

Lice-Infested Irish Salmon

Continued (update 18 December 2012)
- Ireland’s Parasite Problems Exposed by ‘FishyLeaks’

Another leaked Government report reveals that Irish farmed salmon - including so-called 'organic' salmon farms - are breaching sea lice levels by over three times.  Marine Harvest's salmon farm in Lough Swilly is so infested with parasitic sea lice that there are over 44 sea lice per farmed salmon whilst Mannin Bay's 'organic' salmon are infested with over 15 sea lice per farmed salmon!

The latest data (November 2012) compiled by the Marine Institute reveals that Marine Harvest is breaching the sea lice protocol level (set at 2 ovigerous - pregnant female - lice per farmed salmon) for the FIFTH month running.  

Sea Lice Nov 2012 snapshot

Read November 2012 sea lice data in full online here

 

In October 2012 Marine Harvest’s feedlot in Lough Swilly was infested with 54 sea lice per fish – breaching the Irish Government’s protocol levels by almost five times along with Mannin Bay’s ‘organic’ salmon feedlot at Corhounagh.  In September 2012, Marine Harvest’s feedlot in Mulroy Bay was infested with 58 sea lice per farmed salmon with Lough Swilly infested with a staggering 71 sea lice per farmed salmon (both over five times the Government’s sea lice protocol level)!

 

"Lice-infested Irish farmed salmon - including 'organic' salmon - should be avoided like the plague," said Don Staniford of the Global Alliance Against Industrial Aquaculture (GAAIA) in a press release (18 December).  "The Irish Government should be controlling sea lice infestation on salmon farms not promoting even bigger feedlots such as the proposed 15,000 tonne farm in Galway Bay.  Join the boycott of farmed salmon and send a festive message to Marine Harvest that disease-ridden salmon does not belong on the Christmas menu."

Wild fish

GAAIA is now writing to the Irish Government, Marine Harvest and Mannin Bay Salmon asking why sea lice protocol levels are being flagrantly breached month after month - read GAAIA's letter (18 December) addressed to the Ireland's Fisheries Minister Simon Coveney online here

Excuses

The Sunday Times Ireland reported (16 December):

"Gerry O’Donohue, of Mannin Bay Salmon, said sea lice were a problem for all fish farms. “We are very careful to ensure that we do everything possible to reduce the prevalence of sea lice in our salmon stocks.  “We have learnt how to deal with sea lice. When high levels of sea lice are detected, we harvest the fish, as we are an organic farm and do not use chemicals,” he said.

Marine Harvest Ireland said its Irish operations were audited 14 times a year by officials from the Marine Institute.  “We note that the control protocols in respect of sea lice operated by the Marine Institute on behalf of the state are more advanced than those operated in other jurisdictions, as the inspection regime is independent of the industry,” the company said.

“Data obtained as a result of inspections is published and treatment trigger levels are set at a low level. These controls are widely accepted as representing best practice internationally. Marine Harvest Ireland conforms fully with this leading pest control strategy.  “We implement tried-and- tested operational procedures to control sea lice. On occasion, given certain climatic conditions, lice can be more prevalent and this has occurred this year as the reports clearly illustrate.”

The Marine Institute declined to comment." 

Sunday Times Ireland 16 Dec 2012 #2

 

The Irish Examiner reported (15 December):

"Marine Harvest last night defended the figures, saying sea lice control protocols in Ireland are “more advanced that those operated in other jurisdictions as the inspection regime is totally independent of the industry”.  “These controls are widely accepted as representing best practice internationally. Marine Harvest Ireland conforms fully with this leading pest-control strategy. Given certain climatic conditions, lice can be more prevalent and this has occurred this year”.

 “Best practice in fish farming is to optimise stock rotation and separation by having a greater number of sites. This is why we have applied for a licence application for Shot Head, to complement our existing facilities by enabling improved rotation of our fish stocks therefore implementing best practice with regard to lice control.”

Bullshit bovine excrement
 

Read a year’s data on sea lice infestation on Irish salmon farms via:

- November 2012: online here

- October 2012: online here

- September 2012: online here

- August 2012: online here

- July 2012: online here

- June 2012: online here

- May 2012: online here

- April 2012: online here

- March 2012: online here

- February 2012: online here

- December 2011 to January 2012: online here


For more details see below
 

Sea lice

 

==========================================================================================

Lice-Infested Irish Salmon Continued
- Ireland’s Parasite Problems Exposed by ‘FishyLeaks’


FishyLeaks today (11 December 2012) published leaked Government reports cataloguing sea lice infestation on Irish salmon farms.  The damming data reveals that Marine Harvest’s feedlot in Lough Swilly was infested with 54 sea lice per fish in October 2012 – breaching the Irish Government’s protocol levels by almost five times along with Mannin Bay’s ‘organic’ salmon feedlot at Corhounagh.  In September 2012, Marine Harvest’s feedlot in Mulroy Bay was infested with 58 sea lice per farmed salmon with Lough Swilly infested with a staggering 71 sea lice per farmed salmon (both over five times the Government’s sea lice protocol level)!

Read the leaked sea lice data online via FishyLeaks - including for October 2012:

Sea Lice Oct 2012 snapshot

 

And for September 2012:

Sea lice Sept 2012 snapshot


Read a year’s sea lice data in full online via FishyLeaks
 
“The public has a right to know that the Irish salmon farming industry is already being plagued by severe sea lice infestation,” said Don Staniford of the Global Alliance Against Industrial Aquaculture (GAAIA).  “It is a policy of reckless abandon for the Irish Government to be sponsoring a new 15,000 tonne feedlot in Galway Bay – the world’s largest salmon farm which would double salmon farming production in Ireland.  Sea lice infested Irish farmed salmon – including so-called ‘organic’ salmon - should be avoided like the plague.” 

3 pack sea lice

 

The revelations come in the wake of a scientific paper published by the Royal Society in November which concluded that sea lice from salmon farms are killing wild salmon.  Minister of State with responsibility for Natural Resources Fergus O Dowd, TD, welcomed the report stating “from the results of this detailed study, it is crucial that sea lice levels are maintained below these protocol levels”.  However, the latest ‘National Survey of Sea Lice on Fish Farms in Ireland – 2011’ published in February 2012 revealed that 50% of Irish salmon farms breached sea lice levels in 2011 compared to 40% in 2010 and 24% in 2009. 

Sea lice

“The sea lice crisis is spiralling out of control,” continued Staniford.  “No wonder the Marine Institute is desperately trying to keep a lid on the can of worms that is Irish salmon farming.  Ireland is a law unto itself and is consistently flouting sea lice protocol levels despite a 2009 complaint to the European Commission by Salmon Watch Ireland.  Shame on Ireland and shame on Norway which now controls over 60% of Irish salmon farming production via the Norwegian-owned multinational Marine Harvest.”   

Don salmon harming sea lice

 
The leaked monthly sea lice reports include the following statement: “This data is supplied for the information of the recipient only and is not to be used, cited, or conveyed to third parties without the prior permission of the Marine Institute”.   However last month, the Donegal News (30 November) reported on sea lice problems in Mulroy Bay and Lough Swilly.  “They are intended for information only,” said a spokesperson for the Irish Government.  “The full set of inspection results together with a detailed commentary is published annually and posted on the Marine Institute web-site.”
 

Donegal News 30 Nov 2012


 
Marine Harvest’s latest financial reports refer to disease problems including sea lice infestation and Amoebic Gill Disease.   Marine Harvest’s Q3 2012 report includes:

“As indicated in previous reports, the Irish operation has struggled with amoebic gill disease (AGD) for several months. Due to favourable conditions for the amoeba in the quarter, mortality losses and treatment costs were substantial in the period. Exceptional mortality in the amount of NOK 14 million was recognised in the quarter.”

MH Ireland Q3 2012
 

 

Marine Harvest’s Q2 2012 report includes:

 “Cost wise, feed and sea lice mitigation costs have increased compared to 2011. High mortality in the 2012 harvest generation influenced the cost level in the period and will increasingly do so going forward.”

MH Ireland Q2 2012
 

Watch a video report from Marine Harvest’s operations in Mulroy Bay – online via “"Nature has struck back and said "No More!" - Noel Carr on Salmon Farms”  

Noel Carr video #1
 


Read a year’s sea lice data in full online via FishyLeaks

- October 2012: online here

- September 2012: online here

- August 2012: online here

- July 2012: online here

- June 2012: online here

- May 2012: online here

- April 2012: online here

- March 2012: online here

- February 2012: online here

- December 2011 to January 2012: online here

Sea lice photo Royal Society paper Nov 2012

 

Read the press release - "Lice-Infested Irish Salmon: Ireland’s Parasite Problems Exposed by ‘FishyLeaks’" - in full online here

 

Scotland's Secrets Exposed!

FishyLeaks, 11 September 2012

Scottish Salmon’s Toxic Toilets Named & Shamed!
- Twelve-Fold Increase in Chemical Use Since 2005
 
Read press release in full online here

The use of toxic chemicals on Scottish salmon farms more than doubled between 2008 and 2011 and has increased twelve-fold since 2005. 

Read exclusively in today’s Guardian newspaper via “Scottish fish farmers use record amounts of parasite pesticides” and “Chemicals to control salmon parasites”.

According to data obtained via Freedom of Information from the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA), the ‘Filthy Five’ users of toxic chemicals were Marine Harvest, Scottish Salmon Company (Lighthouse Caledonia), Scottish Sea Farms (Leroy/SalMar), Hjaltland Seafarms (Grieg) and Loch Duart.  The ‘Dirty Dozen’ sites using Azamethiphos, Cypermethrin, Deltamethrin, Emamectin benzoate and Teflubenzuron are named for the first time – including Special Areas of Conservation such as Loch Roag and Loch Laxford.    
 
Chemical resistance means that a cocktail of five toxic pesticides are now used to kill Scotland’s plague of ‘super-lice’.  Almost twice every day for the last four years (2008-2011), chemicals known to be lethal to lobsters and other shellfish were used on salmon farms in Scotland.  Chemicals were used 2,756 times including Emamectin (1,028); Deltamethrin (914); Azamethiphos (487); Cypermethrin (315) and Teflubenzuron (12).
 
Read in full via ‘Dossier of Chemical Use on Scottish Salmon Farms 2008-2011
 
The news comes in the wake of a Veterinary Residues Committee report detailing contamination in Scottish farmed salmon with the toxic pesticide Emamectin.  In June, officers from Marine Scotland were charged with carrying out a follow up investigation.  Data obtained via FOI reveals that since 2005 Marine Harvest, Scottish Sea Farms, Skelda Salmon and the Scottish Salmon Company have all been involved in contamination cases.  
 
“The Scottish Government has sanctioned the use of Scotland’s coastal waters as a dumping ground for the chemical wastes of Norwegian and Polish corporations,” said Don Staniford of the Global Alliance Against Industrial Aquaculture (GAAIA).  “Scotland’s toxic salmon farms are now infested with resistant ‘super-lice’ and contaminated with chemicals.  The drugs don’t work – just say no to chemically embalmed Scottish farmed salmon.”

For more information read the 'Media Backgrounder: Chemical Culture in Scotland'

Read press release in full online here


17 July 2012

Leaked Report Reveals ‘Data Cleansing’ of Diseased Salmon Farming

A leaked report reveals that the Scottish Government has been secretly "cleansing data" on Scottish salmon farms.  The "data cleansing" project - called 'Scotland's Aquaculture Database' - is scheduled to go online at the end of July with publicity materials sent to schools across Scotland (read more via 'Scotland's Secrets'). 

However, thanks to the Global Alliance Against Industrial Aquaculture (GAAIA) who obtained the damning data via Freedom of Information, Fishyleaks can publish the raw and 'dirty data' online now!  

FishyLeaks reveals: 
 
- A 'mort mountain' of nearly 7 million farmed salmon in 2011 with over 2 million morts in the first three months of 2012 
 
- 700,000 morts in Orkney alone during March 2012 with 194,905 at one site (Bay of Vady) operated by Meridian
 
- Over a quarter of a million farmed salmon (267,114) with a weight of 291,056 kg died during October 2011 at the Scottish Salmon Company’s site at St. Molios on the Isle of Arran
 
- Infectious diseases including: Infectious Salmon Anaemia, Ichthyobodo, Vibrio, Cardiomyopathy, Moritella vicosa, Yersinia ruckeri, Epitheliocystis, Salmonid alphavirus, Nephrocalcinosis, Tenacibaculum maritumum, Exophiala, Pasteurella skyensis, Nocardia, Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Gyrodactylus derjavinoides and Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis
 
- The use of the toxic chemicals Deltamethrin, Azamethiphos, Teflubenzuron and Emamectin benzoate by companies including Marine Harvest, Hjaltland (Grieg), Scottish Salmon Company, Scottish Seafarms and Loch Duart

Details in full below and more background via 'Scotland's Secrets'!
 

Fish Farmageddon:

Read data on infectious diseases on Scottish salmon farms operated by companies including the Norwegian companies Marine Harvest, Hjaltland (Grieg), Scottish Seafarms (Leroy/SalMar) and the Scottish Salmon Company:

- 2012 disease data: online here
- 2011 disease data: online here
- 2010 disease data: online here
- 2009 disease data: online here
- 2008 disease data: online here

[Information supplied via FOI by Marine Scotland in May 2012]

Diseases reported since 2008 include Infectious Salmon Anaemia, Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis, Haemorrhagic smolt syndrome, Amoebic Gill Disease, Ichthyobodo, Vibrio, Cardiomyopathy syndrome, Moritella vicosa, Yersinia ruckeri, Saprolegnia, Epitheliocystis, Salmonid alphavirus, Nephrocalcinosis, Tenacibaculum maritumum, Exophiala, Pasteurella skyensis, Renibacterium salmoninarum, Piscirickettsia salmonis, Capriniana, Proliferative kidney disease, Nocardia, Aeromonas hydrophila, Aeromonas salmonicida, Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Gyrodactylus derjavinoides and Gyrodactylus truttae (more details enclosed below).
 

Lurking on Scottish salmon farms are some real-life horrors including Epitheliocystis which is associated with Chlamydia and Proliferative Gill Inflammation; and Yersinia ruckeri which is in the same family of pathogens as Yersinia pestis – the disease agent behind the Black Death or Bubonic Plague
 
Data on infectious diseases on Scottish salmon farms for the period 1980 to 1997 is also available online here.  Data from 1998 to 2006 is online here.  Company specific data is also available for 2006 and 2007.    
 
For more background read ‘Fish Farmageddon: The Infectious Salmon Aquacalypse’ and ‘Farmed Salmon Exposed: Global Statistics

Scotland's 'Mort Mountain':

Exclusive data obtained via FOI from the Scottish Environment Protection Agency reveal for the extent of ‘morts’ (dead farmed salmon) on Scottish salmon farms.  In 2011 there were 6.9 million morts – an increase on the 5.3 million morts reported during 2010.  2012 is shaping up to be even worse - already during the first three months of 2012 there have been 2.2 million morts!      

During the first three months of 2012 alone, Hjlaltland Seafarms (owned by the Norwegian multinational Grieg) racked up nearly half a million (475,512) mortalities (read data in full online here).  Marine Harvest (also Norwegian-owned) was responsible for 340,631 'morts' (dead farmed salmon) in the same period (read data online here).  

The ‘mort mountain’ includes nearly 700,000 dead farmed salmon from just 11 sites operated by Northern Isles Salmon (Meridian/Morpol) in Orkney during March 2012.  To put this into perspective, this is double the morts from Marine Harvest's 26 active sites (141,989) and Hjaltland's 22 active sites (207,804) combined during March 2012.  The deaths include 194,905 at one site (Bay of Vady) with another 98,550 at the Bay of Cleat North site and 12,758 kg of morts from the Bay of Ham site.  

During 2011, the Scottish Salmon Company (another company registered on the Oslo Stock Exchange) had over one million mortalities (1,234,975 dead farmed salmon to be precise) including 267,114 at one site (St. Molios on the Isle of Arran) in October 2011 - read the data in full online here.

Over a quarter of a million farmed salmon (265,113) died during May 2011 at Northern Isle Salmon’s Djuba Wick site in Shetland.  Another mass mortality occurred in October 2010 when 197,277 farmed salmon died at Lakeland’s Point of Burkwell site in Shetland.  In 2011, Lakeland and (Northern Isles Salmon) became part of Meridian (owned by the Polish company Morpol).  


Here's the mort data for 2010-2012 (up to the end of March):

2012 (January to March):
 
Total: 2,225,686 (2.2 million dead farmed salmon)
 
Meridian*: 1,063,269
Hjaltland (Grieg): 475,512
Marine Harvest: 340,631
Scottish Salmon Company: 197,435
Scottish Seafarms: 145,803 
Wester Ross Fisheries: 3,036
 
* includes Northern Isles, Hoganess and Lakeland
 
January:
Marine Harvest: 79,608
Hjaltland (Grieg): 69,520
Hoganess (Meridian): 60,707
Scottish Salmon Company: 60,072
Scottish Seafarms Shetland: 41,818
Northern Isles Orkney (Meridian): 19,589
Scottish Seafarms Mainland: 18,023  
Lakeland Marine (Meridian): 14,781  
Lakeland Unst (Meridian): 4,995
Northern Isles Shetland (Meridian): 4,628
Wester Ross Fisheries: 1,358 
 
February:
Hjaltland (Grieg): 198,188
Marine Harvest: 119,034
Hoganess (Meridian): 81,977
Lakeland Marine (Meridian): 68,511
Scottish Salmon Company: 60,055
Scottish Seafarms Mainland: 32,101
Scottish Seafarms Shetland: 27,484 
Northern Isles Orkney (Meridian): 26,201
Lakeland Unst (Meridian): 7,398
Northern Isles Shetland (Meridian): 3,119
Wester Ross Fisheries: 830
 
March:
Northern Isles Orkney (Meridian): 694,143
Hjaltland (Grieg): 207,804
Marine Harvest: 141,989
Scottish Salmon Company: 77,308
Lakeland Marine (Meridian): 55,613
Lakeland Unst (Meridian): 24,333
Scottish Seafarms Mainland: 13,507
Scottish Seafarms Shetland: 12,870
Hoganess (Meridian): 4,281
Northern Isles Shetland (Meridian): 3,819
Wester Ross Fisheries: 848
 
2011:
 
Total: 6,870,577 (6.9 million dead farmed salmon)
 
Hjaltland (Grieg): 1,588,722
Marine Harvest: 1,486,650
Meridian (Morpol): 1,305,423
Scottish Salmon Company: 1,234,975
Scottish Seafarms (Leroy/SalMar): 667,683
Loch Duart: 339,398
Kames: 67,135
Dawnfresh: 48,592
Balta Island Seafare: 40,535
Wester Ross Fisheries: 25,140
Bound Skerries: 18,648
North Uist Fisheries: 16,329
Mingarry: 14,136
Thompson Bros: 9,829
Lewis Salmon: 5,049
Uyeasound Salmon: 1,687
North Atlantic Fisheries College: 646
 
2010:
 
Total: 5,322,096 (5.3 million dead farmed salmon)
 
Hjaltland (Grieg): 1,709,344
Marine Harvest: 1,086,367
Lakeland: 525,837
Lighthouse Caledonia: 509,909
Scottish Seafarms: 505,792
Loch Duart: 334,314
Kames: 186,317
Northern Isles Salmon (Mainstream/Cermaq): 161,378
West Minch Salmon: 156,549
Green Island Organics (Dales Voe): 35,477 
Westray Salmon: 21,472
Wester Ross Fisheries: 20,394  
Balta Island Seafare: 18,707
North Uist Fisheries: 13,102
Hoganess: 11,468
Thompson Bros: 7,036
Bound Skerries: 5,015
Rysa: 4,657
Uyeasound Salmon: 4,657
North Atlantic Fisheries College: 2,825
Lewis Salmon: 1,479

Scotland's Toxic Toilets:

Read 'dirty data' on toxic chemicals and mortalities via 'Scotland's Pollutant Release Inventory':

- 2012: Hjaltland (Grieg): online here
- 2012: Scottish Salmon Company: online here
- 2012: Marine Harvest: online here
- 2012: Scottish Seafarms (Shetland only): online here
- 2012: Scottish Seafarms (Mainland only): online here
- 2012: Scottish Seafarms (Orkney only): online here

- 2011: Scottish Salmon Company: online here
- 2011: Loch Duart (Uist only): online here
- 2011: Loch Duart (Mainland only): online here
- 2011: Marine Harvest: online here
- 2011: Hjaltland (Grieg): online here
- 2011: Scottish Seafarms (Mainland only): online here
- 2011: Scottish Seafarms (Shetland only): online here
- 2011: Scottish Seafarms (Orkney only): online here

This information was made available by the Scottish Environment Protection Agency via a CD of dozens of data files in May 2012 - please note SEPA's data re-use statement - online here.  Data is also available for all other companies and for the years 2008-2010 (please email dstaniford@gaaia.org if you want the raw data as Excel spreadsheets). 

The data includes the following use of toxic chemicals and mortalities during the month of January 2012 at selected Marine Harvest sites (Slice is Emamectin benzoate; AMX = Alphamax which is Deltamethrin and Salmosan is Azamethiphos):

Read in full online here and for a review of toxic chemicals read 'Silent Spring of the Sea'

In 2012, the toxic chemical Deltamethrin (Alphamax) was used at salmon farms including:
 
Ardintoul – Marine Harvest
Duich – Marine Harvest
Geo of Valladale (Urafirth) – Hjaltland (Grieg)
Setterness South - Hjaltland (Grieg)
Cole Deep - Hjaltland (Grieg)
Druimyeon Bay – Scottish Salmon Company
Kyles Vuia East - Scottish Salmon Company
Gravir Outer - Scottish Salmon Company
Vuia Beag, Lewis - Scottish Salmon Company
Earnsaig (Nevis A) – Scottish Seafarms
Allt a Chois/North Shore - Scottish Seafarms
 
In 2012, the toxic chemicals Azamethiphos (Salmosan) and Deltamethrin were used at salmon farms including:
 
Erisort, North Shore – Marine Harvest
Sgeir Bhuidhe – Marine Harvest
Creag an Sagairt – Marine Harvest
Maol Ban – Marine Harvest
 
In 2012, Emamectin benzoate (SLICE), Deltamethrin and Azamethiphos were used at salmon farms including:
 
Cairidh – Marine Harvest
Glencripesdale – Marine Harvest
Camus Glas – Marine Harvest
Invasion Bay – Marine Harvest
Sconser, Balmeanach Bay – Marine Harvest
Olnafirth South - Hjaltland (Grieg)
 
For more raw data for 2011 and 2010 please visit “Scotland’s Secrets

Read a letter (12 July 2012) from the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) on 'Scotland's Aquaculture Database' - online here

The Infectious Salmon Aquacalypse:

The use of toxic chemicals and deaths of farmed salmon is symptomatic of a disease-ridden industry.  In fact, data obtained from the Scottish Government via FOI in May 2012 reveals alarming disease problems across Scotland. 

2012 disease data (up to the start of April) includes: 

Read 2012 disease data in full online here

2011 disease data includes:

Read 2011 disease data in full online here

2010 disease data includes:

Read 2010 disease data in full online here

2009 disease data includes:


Read 2009 disease data in full online here

2008 disease data includes:

Read 2008 disease data in full online here


 

Canadian Cover-Up on Infectious Salmon Anaemia - read documents online here

Read all the documents online here